Air-conditioning technician

 

 

Prasanth Kumar is enthusiastic: ITC training centre teaches “honest business management”

Prasanth Kumar comes from a poor background. His story is similar to that of many boys from Andhra Pradesh: “We lived in Guntur, where I went to school. After I had graduated from secondary school, my parents’ financial resources were exhausted. They were not in a position to fund any vocational education.” This meant that the only professional prospect he had was to become a day labourer or, with some luck, maybe taxi driver like his father.

Not only exceptional for Indian conditions: The ITC (Industrial Training Centre) in Chilakaluripet offers courses on “Morals and Ethics in Business”. The seminars provide budding technicians with tips, as to how one can manage a company in a difficult environment without corruption, fraud and bribes.

Not only exceptional for Indian conditions: The ITC (Industrial Training Centre) in Chilakaluripet offers courses on “Morals and Ethics in Business”. The seminars provide budding technicians with tips, as to how one can manage a company in a difficult environment without corruption, fraud and bribes.

Professional and private wishes

But Prasanth dreams of self-employment. He owes the fact that today he is indeed owner of a small company to a contact with the ITC (Industrial Training Centre) in Chilakaluripet. The training centre, with emphasis on technology, which is run by wortundtat partner AMG, trains disadvantaged or disabled young people to become plumbers, lathe operators, communication electricians, mechanics and welders. Thanks to its excellent reputation, the 400 graduates each year are very much sought after by companies in the wider region.

Prasanth chooses ‘Air-conditioning technology’ as his subject and becomes an enthusiastic participant of events on ethical behaviour in companies. Following his training and work experience he takes his exam. Further stations in a dairy factory and in a company in the million-strong metropolis Hyderabad follow. With his own servicecentre for cooling technology, he is able to fulfil for the first time his wish to be self-employed, securing him and some employees their existence.

However, the young entrepreneur also has private wishes, which are closely interwoven with his hometown Guntur. Prasanth: “I wanted to get married, have a family and at last return to my community.”During his training at the ITC, he had joined a Christian congregation and learned to play the keyboard. “I wanted to attend church again, musically accompany the congregation’s singing and help to spread the Gospel.”The thought is quickly turned into practice. In November 2011, Prasanth opens a new repair shop for ventilation engineering in his hometown. Today, the income generated thereby enables him and five employees with their families to live comfortably. He is grateful for this: “God has given me so much. Now it is my turn to help the poor – professionally and privately.”